Canadian jails try methods to stop drone contraband smuggling

Official: "We want to take advantage of the modern technology out there. Drones are part of everyday life now … they're going to be impacting security"


By C1 Staff

HALIFAX — A new jail in Canada is researching the use of detectors to prevent the invasion of drug-bearing drones that have plagued other prisons.

Staff at the Northeast Nova Scotia Correctional Facility are looking at obtaining their own drones for perimeter checks and surveillance, along with using various detection methods to detect drones that aren’t government operated and may pose a threat to the facility, reports the Hamilton Spectator.

A drone carrying a video camera being demonstrated in France. The now-common flying devices have in some instances been used to lower contraband into outdoor areas within correctional facilities.
A drone carrying a video camera being demonstrated in France. The now-common flying devices have in some instances been used to lower contraband into outdoor areas within correctional facilities. (Photo Francois Mori/The Associated Press)

“We want to take advantage of the modern technology out there. Drones are part of everyday life now … they’re going to be impacting security,” said Tim Carroll, superintendent of the facility.

The facility has made contact with the French-based Orelia Inc., one of the few firms competing in the new drone detection market.

Sensors made by the company, running at about $3,000 each, lock onto the sound of whirring drone blades while competitor’s devices lock in on Wi-Fi frequencies, use radar, or employ infrared cameras.

The Nova Scotia facility has also recently purchased a $200,000 body scanner to help detect and prevent the smuggling of contraband into the facility.

Copyright © 2021 Corrections1. All rights reserved.